Disc Herniation Part 2 – How do I know if I have a slipped disc?

How do I know if I have a slipped disc – What are the common signs and symptoms?

Some of the symptoms that individuals with slipped disc may experience are:

  • Pain when coughing or sneezing
  • Pain worsening during extension of low back, sitting or standing
  • Numbness, tingling sensation that radiates to the limbs
  • Weakness of muscles 

How is it diagnosed?

Slipped disc are generally diagnosed with a series of physical tests, neurological tests and diagnostic imaging. The gold standard for diagnosing a slipped disc is through a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

An MRI allows a physician to analyse the state of the disc tissues in detail (i.e. annular tears, disc herniation) the extent of the damage and which levels of your spinal (intervertebral) discs have been affected.

How does slipped disc affect my body?

Disc material that are protruding out of the disc space, will reduce the space within the spinal column. The spinal column which allows the spinal cord and nerve roots to run through it. This enables the central nervous system of the body to carry out its function, which is to send messages (nerve impulses) to all parts of the body (i.e. vital organs, muscles). When the nervous system of the body is affected, it inhibits the body from functioning and carrying out its natural processes optimally.

This may lead to individuals experiencing neurological symptoms, such as muscle weakness, atrophy and unusual sensations (numbness and tingling) in the upper or lower limbs.

In addition, disc injuries do not only affect the musculoskeletal system of the body. Some may also experience effects on other systems of the body, such as endocrine and excretory, as the nerves also innervate the organs that help with bladder control and major hormone glands of the body.

Disc herniation may impinge on nerves that send messages to those specific organs, causing interruption to the normal flow of signals between the organs. Thus, a nerve impingement may affect the ability of your body to regulate and maintain your body’s homeostasis.

Here at Healthworks, we often see clients that are diagnosed with a slipped disc. With the use of our integrative healthcare services, we do our best to help clients achieve pain relief, have better joint movement and have a more active lifestyle.

Drop in and see us… don’t let the condition get the best out of you – ensure that you get the best out of your life!

Disc Herniation Part 2 – How do I know if I have a slipped disc?2018-07-23T08:09:38+08:00

Disc Herniation Part 1 – What is a slipped disc?

We often have patients that visit our clinic and say, “I think I have a slipped disc”, however not many fully understand what a slipped disc is and how it can affect the body. This article will share with you the important details you will need to know if you think you may have a slipped disc. 

What is a slipped disc?

A slipped disc occurs when there are tears on the outer fibrous layers of the disc, allowing the gel-like material (nucleus pulposus) within the disc to ‘slip’ (push out) of the disc. However, the extent of a ‘slipped disc’ may vary in severity.

If the disc material has moved out of its original position and shape but some of the outer layers of the disc are still intact (partial tear) and are able to contain the nucleus pulposus, it is known as a disc prolapse (also known as, disc bulge).

However, if a particular region of the outer layers of a disc has completely torn and the disc material (nucleus pulposus) has begun to project out of the disc, it is known as a disc extrusion.

Lastly, if the outer fibrous layers of the disc have completely torn, the disc material has projected out of the disc and the material (nucleus pulposus) begins to travel to different positions and levels outside of the disc region, it is known as a disc sequestration.

 

How does it happen?

Slipped disc can occur due to trauma or degeneration over a long period of time (wear and tear).

Usually in the case of trauma, an activity causing excessive rotation and axial loading on the lower back causes damage to the disc. This is because of the way the outer layers of the disc (annulus fibrosus) are built, which makes it prone to injury when put under a rotational force. Coupled with carrying the weight of our body and with external load, additional stress is caused to the disc.

 

Whereas, for ‘degeneration’ the fibrous tissue that make up the disc slowly experience wear and tear over a period of time. The healing process is no longer occurring as rapidly as the breaking down process, causing injuries to accumulate.

These conditions cause the outer (annulus fibre) of the discs to tear, allowing the gel-like material (nucleus pulposus) in the disc to project and protrude out of the disc space.

To learn more on how to know if you may have slipped disc, head over to the second part of this article. Here at Healthworks, we often see clients that are diagnosed with a slipped disc. With the use of our integrative healthcare services, we do our best to help clients achieve pain relief, have better joint movements and have a more active lifestyle.

Drop in and see us… don’t let the condition get the best out of you – ensure that you get the best out of life!

Disc Herniation Part 1 – What is a slipped disc?2018-07-23T06:49:52+08:00

High Heel Alert!

High Heel Alert!

High heels have become a modern necessity for ladies rather than just for fashion. It gives women a sense of elegance, of superiority and femininity. The history of high heels began a thousand years ago as status of wealth and superiority – in the 1700s, King Louis XIV was shown in a portrait to be wearing a pair of red heels! However, the saying “beauty does not come without a price” may well be true in this case as there are many health implications of wearing a pair of stilettos…

Health Implications

1) Postural Imbalances
Wearing of heels contributes to postural adaptations due to the changes in the location of the feet and the centre of gravity (CoG).  Postural adaptations first happen with the elevation of the ankle which causes a forward displacement of the CoG generating postural imbalances, promoting adaptive postural adjustments for balance recovery and to maintain the upright posture.

2) Risk of Hallux Valgus (bunions)
Wearing heels results in a forward  and middle shift of forces within the foot; forefoot forces increase, and the force concentration,  stress, and loading rate at the first toe dramatically increase, while those over the fifth toe decrease. This has been linked to forefoot deformities such as hallux valgus (bunion).

3) Risk of Valgus Knees (knock knee appearance)
In knees, the use of high heels increases the forces on the articulation of the knee joint. Valgus knees are commonly seen among adolescents who wear high heels, more so in those who wear needle heels.

4) Lumbar Hyperlordosis (exaggerated curve of the lumbar spine)
The change in knee alignment induces the hips to rotate towards the side of the body and, hence, an increase in forward pelvic tilt. This causes a decrease in the flexibility of the spinal muscles and weakening of the abdominal muscles, which promotes the forward displacement of the Centre of Gravity and favours lumbar hyperlordosis.

5) Increase Risk of Sprain and Strain of the ankle joint
With literally no or little support from the base of the heel, the ankle structures are susceptible to injuries especially those who does not have a strong sense of balance.

To avoid occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms and installation of permanent postural disorders, it is critical to perform an early evaluation of body posture, either by your Chiropractor or physiotherapist, to identify potential musculoskeletal adaptations and indicate appropriate corrective measures.

High Heel Alert!2018-07-23T06:22:33+08:00

Personal Protection & Safety Talk

Join us for a FREE Personal Protection & Safety Talk!
Event attendees will enjoy 50% off for first trial class (NP: RM350)
Workshop will be conducted by U-Waye Chong, the Training Director for PTKGO Asia and will cover topics bellow:
1. Intro – Orientation to Personal Protection and the System 5 Minutes
2. Soft Skills (situational awareness, mindset, etc)
3. Hard skills (physical execution)
4. Physical Demonstration
Seats are limited, RSVP before 26th July 2018. Call 03-6211 7533 or email contact@myhealthworks.com.my

Personal Protection & Safety Talk2018-07-30T06:42:21+08:00
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